Tag Archives: Mexico

Expats and Legends

hey people, last week i mentioned writing for Nowhere’s Magazine’s blog, and i just wanted to expand on that, ’cause i know some of y’all will be down to hear it! i’m working on two different series: Expats, a series on diaspora that focuses on places foreigners form communities, stories about displacement and profiles of people who lived between identities. Legends is a series profiling personalities and places that have left a mark on our social landscape but are on the verge of lore, like communities at risk of endangerment, people with obsolete skills and explorers whose stories ended in mystery.

Photo by By Alejandro Linares Garcia
Photo by By Alejandro Linares Garcia

Here are two examples and excerpts that were recently published on the site. Feel free to like, comment, share & shit. Legends: Flying Circus Balancing a reed flute in one hand and beating out an ancient rhythmic prayer on a small drum with the other, El Caporal stands 150 feet above the ground atop an erect pole, overseeing the flight of four young dancers gliding counterclockwise around him, like a human pinwheel. The acrobats, known as “bird men” among the Totonac of Veracruz, Mexico, are connected to the pole by a cord of rope wrapped around their waists, and slowly uncoiled from the top, the acrobats descending upside down, with arms outstretched, to the High Priest’s unrelenting tune. Expats: Babble On Jackson Heights began to draw in a boom of enterprising immigrants when reforms loosened New York immigration laws in the 1960s, and today represents the city’s second-largest population of foreign-born residents. One can walk through streets like Kalpana Chawla Way, where bearded vendors canvass gold bangles and spangly saris over a soundtrack of Bollywood hits beating from the nearest shop window, while the IRT # 7 “International Line” rattles overhead every few minutes. And a few blocks away on Calle Colombia, you can order a cafe con leche from a Beijing native in the neighborhood’s most beloved Chino-Latino joint.

Relevant To Your Interests

For you stylish people: “Self-proclaimed hipster who goes by the name ‘Loux the Vintage Guru’ is taking Namibia, Africa by storm, introducing the continent to the wonders of vintage fashion.”

A Vintage-Style Revolution Is Brewing In Namibia, Africa designtaxi.com

Schooling you: “Marriage in Latin America is strictly a civil institution, and as such it is separate from any religious context, quite unlike the situation in the United States. The judicial systems in the U.S. and Latin America also operate from different constitutional frameworks. While the U.S. Constitution remains remarkably faithful to its 18th century foundations, most Latin American nations have in the last three decades introduced new constitutions or wholly revamped old ones. These reforms have made Latin American constitutions especially sensitive to human rights claims, and especially inclined to see gay rights as human rights.”

Why Is Latin America So Progressive on Gay Rights? The New York Times

Who knew some good could come out of FOX News? “To Vanity Fair and Jerry Seinfeld: You are what’s wrong with the liberal “allies.” You epitomize the clueless racist. Because of you, every time I run into a Latino, Black, and Asian kid, it’s bittersweet. On one hand, I admire their optimism. Their goals and dreams. On the other hand, it pains me to know that they won’t be given the same opportunity to accomplish them because some people with a lot of pull will say that they don’t have what it takes. While others – with the power to help prove them wrong – will take that meritocracy myth as gospel and will close doors and put obstacles in their paths instead. We’re not going to take this anymore — your lies, your myths, your incomplete stories.”

Hollywood’s Latino Problem: Vanity Fair, Jerry Seinfeld, And The Myth Of Meritocracy FOX News Latino

“The Mexican-born, Kenyan star’s breakout performance as Patsey in Steve McQueen’s highly-praised “12 Years A Slave” brought about a wave of nominations –and headlines — this awards season. While her quick rise to fame has been on everyone’s lips lately, not many know that Nyong’o shares a deep connection to her native Mexico, as she explained in Spanish during a recent interview with CNN en Español.”

Lupita Nyong’o Talks Being Born In Mexico And Why She Misses It (VIDEO) huff post latino voices

These are really cool: “Even though I was born and raised in Curaçao and I spoke the language, at first sight people always thought that I was Dutch. Then, when I came to Holland in 2001, the people saw me as ‘the immigrant.’ All of a sudden, I was ‘the Black guy.’ It was frustrating. There was no explanation for it, and I realized how little I had actually thought about myself in the context of race.”

12 Beautiful Portraits Of Black Identity Challenging the “One-Drop” Rule policymic.com