Profiles & Interviews

The Revolution Will Go Viral Abernathy Magazine

18163304459_0a159deb68_o
21 year old Kwame Rose found a sense of purpose for life while protesting the death of Freddie Gray during the #BaltimoreUprising, calling out FOX News on live television in a video that has since gone viral. “In 1930, the Baltimore Afro-American reported, “The trouble is police brutality in Baltimore has gone as far as some people are going to stand.”

Expedition Denali: The First All-Black Team to Climb North America’s Highest Mountain Matador Network

8554710081_008e268324_b
This June, 100 years to the month after the highest point in North America, Mt. McKinley (Denali), was first successfully ascended, the first team of African-American climbers will attempt the summit. Besides making history, their expedition can pave the way for a new generation of young people of color to get outside and become stewards of America’s wild places.

The Last Colony Nowhere Magazine

albizu_master
Independance leader Juan Mari Brás was the first Puerto Rican to renounce U.S. citizenship while retaining his Puerto Rican one. “I freed myself from the indignity of a false citizenship… that of the country that invaded mine, which continues to keep the only country that I owe allegiance to as a colony.” Puerto Rico is the last remaining colony of the Americas.

Queer and Trans Artists of Color Abernathy Magazine

"Building a platform to support marginalized artists is really the heart of my work because these people often don’t get support or recognition from the mainstream (read: white, male) art world. If we don’t build our own alternatives, we are never going to get the shine that we
“Building a platform to support marginalized artists is really the heart of my work because these people often don’t get support or recognition from the mainstream (read: white, male) art world. If we don’t build our own alternatives, we are never going to get the shine that we deserve.”

Neruda Abroad Nowhere Magazine

A look at the poet and his work in exile: ”When poet Pablo Neruda fled his native Chile, over the Andes and into Argentina — “[a] trip I have taken through regions that are distant and antipodean,” he later reminisced — he had nearly died before he made it to the other side. He had been living underground for 14 months during President Videla’s crackdown on communism when, in 1948, a warrant was issued for his arrest. “There were no tracks and no paths, and I and my four companions pressed forward on our tortuous way, blindly seeking the quarter in which my own liberty lay.” Buried in his backpack was the manuscript for his epic poem, Canto General.”
A look at the poet and his work in exile: ”When poet Pablo Neruda fled his native Chile, over the Andes and into Argentina — “[a] trip I have taken through regions that are distant and antipodean,” he later reminisced — he had nearly died before he made it to the other side. “There were no tracks and no paths, and I and my four companions pressed forward on our tortuous way, blindly seeking the quarter in which my own liberty lay.” Buried in his backpack was the manuscript for his epic poem, Canto General.”
The Body of Jean-Michel Basquiat Nowhere Magazine

How place played in the artist’s work: “I am an artist who has been influenced by the New York environment. But I do have a cultural memory. I do not need to look for it, it exists. It is over there, in Africa. It does not mean that I have to live over there. Our cultural memory follows us everywhere, wherever we are.”

Ecuador’s Last Ice Man Nowhere Magazine

“Upon approaching Chimborazo Volcano’s natural border where birdsong fades and glaciers begin, the delicate sound of ice melting in the sun can be heard over the wind, like the crackle of toasted rice. Half a century ago, ice miners in this part of Ecuador would journey to the dormant volcano’s crest and return to city markets with blocks of ice for sale. But when electricity and the use of refrigerators became widespread in the region, the number of ice merchants gradually dwindled: today, Baltazar Ushca stands alone as the region’s final ice man.”
“Upon approaching Chimborazo Volcano’s natural border where birdsong fades and glaciers begin, the delicate sound of ice melting in the sun can be heard over the wind, like the crackle of toasted rice. Half a century ago, ice miners in this part of Ecuador would journey to the dormant volcano’s crest and return to city markets with blocks of ice for sale. But when electricity and the use of refrigerators became widespread in the region, the number of ice merchants gradually dwindled: today, Baltazar Ushca stands alone as the region’s final ice man.”

Martin Luther Queen Nowhere Magazine

The exile writings of James Baldwin: “Perhaps home is not a place but simply an irrevocable condition,” wrote James Baldwin in Giovanni’s Room. Seeking sanctuary from the burdens of life as a queer black man in 1940s Harlem, Baldwin expatriated to Paris where he was able to begin demystifying what it meant to be an American, and where he created the works that would mark him as one of the best – and most critically contested – exile writers of all time. “Exile saved my life,” he reflected 13 years later.”
The exile writings of James Baldwin: “Perhaps home is not a place but simply an irrevocable condition,” wrote James Baldwin in Giovanni’s Room. Seeking sanctuary from the burdens of life as a queer black man in 1940s Harlem, Baldwin expatriated to Paris where he was able to begin demystifying what it meant to be an American, and where he created the works that would mark him as one of the best – and most critically contested – exile writers of all time. “Exile saved my life,” he reflected 13 years later.”

¡Cuba Viva! Tambor Abernathy Magazine

An interview with Dash Harris on the significance of the tambor in Afro Cuban culture: ”And that I was blown away and extremely proud to see how ingrained and integral Africa is in Cuba. It is not “othered” and it is not “strange” in Cuba. The men there use a word to greet one another, “asere” and they all say it every second. That is a word [from the eastern region of Nigeria] that basically means “brother.”
An interview with Dash Harris on the significance of the tambor in Afro Cuban culture: ”And that I was blown away and extremely proud to see how ingrained and integral Africa is in Cuba. It is not “othered” and it is not “strange” in Cuba. The men there use a word to greet one another, “asere” and they all say it every second. That is a word [from the eastern region of Nigeria] that basically means “brother.”
Le Tumulte Noir Nowhere Magazine

A short look at Josephine Baker’s life as an expat: “I ran away from St. Louis, and then I ran away from the United States of America, because of that terror of discrimination, that horrible beast which paralyzes one’s very soul and body,” she once said. “I felt liberated in Paris.”
A short look at Josephine Baker’s life as an expat: “I ran away from St. Louis, and then I ran away from the United States of America, because of that terror of discrimination, that horrible beast which paralyzes one’s very soul and body,” she once said. “I felt liberated in Paris.”

I, Too, Am BCC Abernathy Magazine

Orlando Pinder is a Maryland-based high school student and the filmmaker behind the short documentary, I, Too, Am BCC, which follows in the footsteps of the I, Too, Am Harvard project, featuring interviews with Black students in predominantly white schools. I recently got to talk with Orlando about his experience making the film and what he thinks about the future.
Orlando Pinder is a Maryland-based high school student and the filmmaker behind the short documentary, I, Too, Am BCC, which follows in the footsteps of the I, Too, Am Harvard project, featuring interviews with Black students in predominantly white schools. I recently got to talk with Orlando about his experience making the film and what he thinks about the future.

Power On, Fist Up – African Amedia Abernathy Magazine

3
Artist Justin Adu’s African Amedia exhibit addresses the legacy of negative portrayals of Black Americans in the media. I recently talked to Adu about his project and why it’s so relevant today.

Bino and Fino Love the Kids Abernathy Magazine

An interview with Ibrahim Waziri, maker of the Nigerian kid’s show Bino and Fino: “It’s quite moving when you hear how strongly children identify with the characters, going as far as to say how they look like Fino. We are very humbled by it. The children also seem to love our shorts, which teach them how to count in Igbo, Yoruba, and Hausa.“
An interview with Ibrahim Waziri, maker of the Nigerian kid’s show Bino and Fino: “It’s quite moving when you hear how strongly children identify with the characters, going as far as to say how they look like Fino. We are very humbled by it. The children also seem to love our shorts, which teach them how to count in Igbo, Yoruba, and Hausa.“

decolonizing travel culture

%d bloggers like this: