Writing About Ecuador’s Feminist Movement for Teen Vogue

Hey people, today I’m sharing my op-ed for Teen Vogue on the Glorious May Revolution of 1944, a day when radical Ecuadorian women overthrew the sitting fascist president of the country. The takeover of the government palace was led by communist Nela Martinez, and almost a century later, I found myself in her home, which her daughter had opened up for Marcha de las Putas – Ecuador’s answer to the Slut Walk movement – meetings. Here’s a bite:

Nela was a communist, an Indigenous ally, and extremely critical of colonization. She and Cacuango, along with others, founded the country’s first Indigenous rights organization and started the first Kichwa-language newspaper. Nela also started the first feminist newspaper of Ecuador, Nuestra Palabra, or Our Word. In her 91 years, La Nela founded a number of groups for women and workers in Ecuador, as well as the Continental Front of Women Against U.S. Intervention, and an anti-Nazi group formed to eradicate totalitarianism in Ecuador to expose dangerous ideas as fascist and combat the spread of false propaganda. La Nela also once said, “Women are the memory of time wasted and reconquered.” What a badass.

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Portrait of La Nela by Pilar Bustos

Growing up, I felt like I had nothing I could read about in Ecuador in English at all, and what was out there was messed up or misinformed in some way. Not much has changed, you just got white guys writing academic papers on us like they’re some sort of authority – and then there’s travel writing. ::Deep sigh:: That’s a chasm that needs to be bridged. Since I started writing travel, I’ve constantly struggled with how I depict my (other) country to largely white, Western audiences, and it’s real. But I’m also proud to be doing this work and exposing a few more folks to what Ecuador means for Ecuadorians. Read the article in full here, and if you’re into it, go ahead and share that shit, or tip me. And as always, if you got thoughts, you can find me on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. I’ll leave you with this:

The Women’s March crowd could learn from the radical feminist history that we in Ecuador honor. As in La Nela and Cacuango’s day less than a century ago, the threat of fascism is again spreading across the map, and we’re going to need more than pussy hats to fight it. I look back to the spring of 1944 and feel the weight of the baton pass to my generation. The fate of these lands still rests in the hands of young women and nonbinary visionaries, and if we want to avoid another world war, we’ll need to heed La Nela’s words — reconquer wasted time, and bring about a more feminist future.

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