Healing, Walking, Writing, Talking

happy holigays folks, it’s my last post of the year, woohoo! if y’all remember, I fucked up my leg in ecua over the summer and have been on bedrest for the past three months, but on baby jesus eve took my first steps (with a lot of work and the help of my cane…and mom (shoutout to mami)) so that’s the dopest gift I could’ve asked for.

I’m just popping in to share these two articles my work was recently featured in, one being Why We Need to Hear The Voices of Those We Visit on The Road by Jo Eckersley for Epicure & Culture:

1and the second one by Nadia Cho for JetSet Times called 9 Most Inspirational Women Travel Bloggers to Follow:

Bani Amor is an impeccably well-spoken and intellectual queer writer who unwaveringly tackles issues and calls out everything that’s problematic in travel culture and media. From the erasure of indigenous narratives to the continuation of settler colonialism through tourism, Bani confronts the difficult questions surrounding race, privilege and exploitation that most travel writers ignore. There need to be more blogs and travel writers like Bani who forego the vapid wanderlust attitude towards travel and instead radically deconstruct how power and privilege affect people’s travel experiences. Look for Bani Amor’s amazing writings on her blog Everywhere All The Time as well as on Matador Network.

What follows is a short Q & A on problematic travel writing, tourism and imperialism, and advice for traveling QTPOC. Thoughts? Feelings? Lengthy racist comments I can laugh at and delete? Feel free to share them here, on fb, twitter, instagram or tumblr. See y’all in 2016!

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3 thoughts on “Healing, Walking, Writing, Talking”

  1. i think your final point is a big one. Being in charge of stories from your country. I cant stand towns which are just basically run and owned entirely by foreigners. For example – Vang Vieng in Laos. One place where the visitors hardly acknowledge that Lao people even live in the village. It’s a shame worldwide from Lao to New Zealand and beyond that people who work in travel related places, staff hotels and hostels and restaurants, are actually often foreigners.

    1. This. And travelers tend to be surprised by how globalization work through tourism, and lament it, because what’s the point of going halfway around the world if you’re going to have the same homogenized experience everywhere? What you say about displacement caused by tourism is also such a huge problem that most travel writers ignore…

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