Bringing the POC Travel Book Club Back

hey kids, remember when we started a monthly, online book club to read travel literature by people of color earlier this year? Well I got caught up with Lifing so we had to cut it for a few months but since I conducted this Twitter poll last week and autumn is settling in, it’s a good a time as any to bring it back.

We will be reading bell hooks’ Belonging: A Culture of Place which is available for order both electronically and in print at the link above (though it’s easy to find alternatives to Amazon). These usually take place over Google Hangout on the last Sunday of each month, but seeing as that holiday where we pretend Native Americans and their colonizers got along great is happening that weekend, I’m moving the talk to Sunday, December 4th at 1pm EST. It should take a little over an hour, but you’re free to stay or leave whenever. If you’re not already on the list from earlier this year, RSVP below and I’ll invite you to our chat at a quarter to one. Try to be early (if possible, of course) so we don’t have to waste too much time on technical issues. About the book:

What does it mean to call a place home? Who is allowed to become a member of a community? When can we say that we truly belong?

These are some of the questions of place and belonging that renowned cultural critic bell hooks examines in her new book, Belonging: A Culture of Place. Traversing past and present, Belonging charts a cyclical journey in which hooks moves from place to place, from country to city and back again, only to end where she began–her old Kentucky home.

hooks has written provocatively about race, gender, and class; and in this book she turns her attention to focus on issues of land and land ownership. Reflecting on the fact that 90% of all black people lived in the agrarian South before mass migration to northern cities in the early 1900s, she writes about black farmers, about black folks who have been committed both in the past and in the present to local food production, to being organic, and to finding solace in nature. Naturally, it would be impossible to contemplate these issues without thinking about the politics of race and class. Reflecting on the racism that continues to find expression in the world of real estate, she writes about segregation in housing and economic racialized zoning. In these critical essays, hooks finds surprising connections that link of the environment and sustainability to the politics of race and class that reach far beyond Kentucky.

With characteristic insight and honesty, Belonging offers a remarkable vision of a world where all people–wherever they may call home–can live fully and well, where everyone can belong.

Sign up here!

How to Help Haiti, Not Disaster Capitalists

Back in April, when the initial 7.8 earthquake hit Ecuador, I was running around trying to get folks to, first of all, know that we exist, second of all, care, third, care enough to donate for the relief, and fourth, to donate to activist organizations for marginalized folks and families instead of charities, foreign-run NGOs and a host of shady savior campaigns. Now that Hurricane Matthew has devastated Haiti at unthinkable proportions, I’m at least glad that the ‘international community’ is way more aware of what’s at stake, maybe having learned something from the 2010 earthquake (though not many are talking about how the Clintons looted Haiti, but I digress.)

My next feature for Bitch Magazine is actually about all this – what we really mean when we invoke the term ‘natural disaster,’ how they disproportionately affect the marginalized, and what the earthquake did to Ecuador. So, you know, just some light reading.

I’m sharing this list of organizations that you can feel more secure in donating to, in that they’re actually going to those in need and not lining some opportunist’s pockets. This comes from French Francois of the blog First Class is a Lesson:

“I’ve been getting a lot of messages from well-meaning individuals collecting goods to send to Haiti. Let me reiterate: Please DO NOT collect items to send to Haiti. Both the Haitian gov and Haitian orgs have made it clear that this actually hinders rather than helps relief efforts. Anything you can buy in the U.S., you can buy in Port-au-Prince so unnecessary goods end up 1. creating a backlog in customs that prevent emergency relief items, medical supplies, and construction materials from getting in 2. undermining the local economy and putting Haitians out of business by flooding Haiti with free stuff. We are trying not to repeat the mistakes of the earthquake response, well-meaning or not. Instead, please donate money to local organizations already responding to the disaster.”

Konbit Mizik
Haiti Communitere
Sakala Haiti
Fondation Aquin Solidarité
Volontariat pour le Développement d’Haïti
Lambi Fund
MADRE
Sowaseed
Haitian American Caucus
Art Creation Foundation for Children
Prodev Haiti
SOIL

Non-Haitian Orgs with proven track records in Haiti:
Doctors Without Borders
Roots of Development
Partners in Health
Nova Hope for Haiti

Outside the XY Book Release Party!

Sup people. Thanks to everyone who put together and came out to the Women and Gender Nonconforming Writers of Color in Digital Media panel at Comic Con yesterday! ::inhales because that was a mouthful:: I talked about how the whiteness of the travel writing industry has encouraged travelers and writers of color to form their own platforms on social and digital media and the difficulties of traveling and freelancing while disabled, queer, nonbinary, etc.

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Disregard my resting bitch-adjacent face

If you’re in New York, come through to bklyn boihood’s Outside The XY book release party! My essay, Low Visibility, is featured in the anthology alongside works from queer Black and brown folks who are redefining masculinity. Pick up a copy here, and if you’re in the area, come say hi at the function!

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Come See Me at NYC Comic Con!

Hey kids, I’ve been in my writing den for a minute but will emerge with more interviews, articles and projects soon. For now, if you’re in the NYC area, you can come see me speak on the We Need Diverse Books panel on working as writers of color in digital media at Comic Con next Thursday, October 6th! Deets here and Facebook event heredigital-media-nycc-file

If you come through make sure to say hi! I’ll also be at the opening party for the anthology Outside the XY: Queer Black and Brown Masculinity, in which I have an essay on #travelingwhiletrans, on October 10th. I’ll post about that next week. In the meantimes, just wanna shout out to all the new people reading this blog after this salty white dude wrote a whole essay calling me anti-fun, anti-sun, and, gasp, anti-colonialism, all while misgendering me the entire time. I’m officially a tourism killjoy. #StayMad

[Featured photo by Neha Gautam Photography]

Outside the XY: Queer Black and Brown Masculinity

hey people, I have an essay on traveling through place and gender in bklyn boihood’s long-awaited anthology Outside the XY: Queer Black and Brown Masculinity! Published by Riverdale Ave Books, edited by Morgan Mo Willis (of bklyn boihood) with an intro by Toshi Reagon + cover art by Mickalene Thomas, OTXY is filled with stories, confessions, essays, poetry and letters from QTPOCs around the world for whom masculinity has played a role in shaping their lived identities.

My story, called Low Visibility, starts out like this:

In the morning, our plane began to curl downward like a rebellious strand of hair gone straight. I looked out over the cloudscape, a heavy swell of shadows that had been sucked up into the sky, swirling with the corals and blues of the sunrise, and wondered about the other side of turbulence. Having passed through the dysphoria of landing, where your belly’s lost in some buoyant limbo, what would touchdown finally feel like? I wanted to skip alla that. I wanted to be someone, somewhere –clearly defined.

Yes, traveling as a non-cisgender person is some shit. Purchase the book here and support QTPOC writers!

Come See Me At The Queens Book Festival!

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For you New York area folks, come out to the Queens Book Festival to see a million brilliant, diverse and famous authors do their thing at Kaufman Astoria Studios next weekend! I’ll be on the 5pm publishing panel talking about DIY culture; reserve your seats here. It’s free, just a first come first serve type thing. The line-up is incredible; I’m personally *mad* excited to see Edwidge Danticat, Nicole Dennis Benn, Daniel Jose Older, Taye Diggs,  Ibi Zoboi, JP Howard and Zetta Elliot, among others. If you’re not in NYC, you can follow the fest on social media at #QBF. I’ll be tweeting as much as I can from @bani_amor. And if you are in NYC, come say hi. See you there!

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decolonizing travel culture

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